This is me.

Warning: There will be nude/naked pictures on this blog. Some of me and some not. If this offends you GTFO :)
No seriously.

I'm a Fat Activist. Part of the Fat Acceptance movement. The Body Acceptance movement. We are all human beings and we deserve to be treated with respect. Being fat doesn't make me a bad human being or even an unhealthy one. I'm just fat. Get over it.

I love rainbows and girls (more recently boys too) and goth/dark things and sex and disneyland and reading and modeling and photography and editing.

Stop Chris Pratt before it’s too late 2k14

A crunchie?? Lmao. He definitely said “scrunchie” in the interview.

(via bunnyonthemoon)

tastefullyoffensive:

"Get down, Mr. President!" [video]

batmanisagatewaydrug:

thumbtackjuicyfruitspork:

You know when a fast angry song comes on that you know every word to and you’re in just the right mood that your eyes light up with the fire and angst of a thousand punk rockers and you just feel so alive

image

I would not have reblogged this if it wasn’t for the Dr. Horrible pic…because I knew EXACTLY what song they were referencing.

(via bluehairbelle)

I have recently stated how it was not normal to call Severus Snape a hero or romanticize him was wrong because he literally stole Lily's photograph (that she sent to Sirius) and kind of applied mobbing on Harry and many other kids and he is kind of creepy and people a little attacked me because just because they are creepy it doesn't mean we can't romanticize them etc etc. What do you think about it?
rainbowthundercunt rainbowthundercunt Said:

bluehairbelle:

mythandrists:

I think you’re absolutely on the right side of this argument, and here’s what we say to Snape lovers:

We all accept the following to be true, right?

  • Stalking is wrong.
  • Emotional abuse is wrong.
  • Cruelty to children and animals is wrong.
  • Blaming someone for their parents’ actions is wrong.
  • Racial discrimination is wrong.
  • Murder (the killing of civilians when you have no self-defence excuse) is wrong.

We’re good so far, yeah? If you saw someone doing those things in real life, you’d stop them or call the cops, right? I just want to make sure we’re all on the same page here. Morally, those things are wrong (and illegal). So, moving out of hypothetical moral discourse and into the realm of things Snape actually did in the Harry Potter books and/or movies:

  • Snape called Lily a Mudblood, which in the HP verse is a pretty serious racial slur. It’s like using the ‘n’ word or the ‘f’ word (not the ‘fuck’ word) in our society. It’s nasty.
  • Snape treated Hermione terribly and heavily implied that it was because she was Muggle-born. Again, racial discrimination. A teacher in the real-life school I went to was fired for that.
  • Snape was in a position of power over Harry and treated him (and many other Gryffindors) exceedingly poorly. He was rude, condescending, unfair in his enforcement of the rules, manipulative, and probably other things besides. This counts as emotional abuse. If someone in a position of power over you treats you the way Snape treated Harry, even if he saves your life, you are being emotionally abused.
  • On that same note, Snape was a grown man who acted like a five-year-old throwing a tantrum at Harry and his friends.
  • Snape was Neville Longbottom’s worst fear. JKR treats it lightly in the books, but the fact remains that a thirteen-year-old boy was so afraid of Snape that he couldn’t speak to him, and that the thought of him stepping out of a wardrobe was almost too much for Neville to handle. No adult should ever terrify a child like this. It’s emotional abuse, and it’s abuse of power.
  • Snape mistreated Harry because of actions James had taken. Not only is it childish to hold onto this grudge, it’s just plain wrong to treat someone badly because you disliked their parents. This is the same prejudice the Dursleys held against Harry. If you believe that the Dursleys had no excuse for their behaviour, how can you believe that Snape does have one?
  • Snape killed many innocent people just because they were Muggle-born.

I want to address this last point before I move on. Now, you can argue that the cost of a few lives for Snape to get close to Voldemort and help carry out Dumbledore’s grand plan for the war was worth it - and if that was the only crime that Snape had committed, I might be persuaded to see him as morally grey; you might be able to convince me that he was only being a vile person because he had to be. But if you look at the rest of this list, you’ll realise that really, Snape deeply enjoyed being a vile person.

So now you see that Snape was terrible to Harry, Hermione, Neville, and even Lily just because he enjoyed doing it, and you see that he did much worse to complete strangers who had committed no crime.

And that’s just the short list.

Great, now let’s talk about why Snily is one of the worst ships that anyone could ever ship.

  • Snape was cruel to Petunia when they were children, even though Lily was trying very hard to maintain a relationship with her sister despite their differences.
  • Snape tried to manipulate Lily into loving him and only him, and putting aside all of her other relationships.
  • Snape did not respect Lily’s beliefs and opinions.
  • After Lily started dating James, Snape started referring to her as a Mudblood - indicating that his friendship and his “love” were not unconditional.
  • Snape willingly became a Death Eater, a member of a group who hunted people like Lily for fun, and at the time he saw absolutely nothing wrong with that.
  • After Lily’s death, Snape left her son in his crib. He left a crying, helpless infant all alone in a wrecked house in a thunderstorm while there were rogue Death Eaters on the loose. He essentially left Harry to die.
  • And then he cut the two people she loved most out of her photograph and pretended that they had never existed, that he was the only person who mattered in her life.
  • And then, as mentioned above, he abused Harry emotionally and became the bane of his existence for years.

Snape did not love Lily. You don’t call someone you love a racial slur. You don’t insist that the person you love choose you over her other friends. If the person you love has a son she gave her life for, you don’t treat him badly just because you feel like it.

Yes, even if that love is unrequited.

What Snape felt for Lily was not love; it was possessiveness. He wanted her to be his. He wanted her to leave James for him. He wanted her to pick sides for him. He wanted to hold her close and smother her and never let her go. Snape didn’t love Lily; he loved himself. He was a narcissistic, bitter, emotionally abusive creep who couldn’t deal with the fact that his first crush ended up marrying someone else.

"But wait!" you say, white-knuckling your desk and probably wishing you had a wand to hex me with for saying such things about your baby. "He had an abusive childhood! He was lonely! He was sad! He was greasy and no one loved him! Doesn’t that excuse everything?”

Keep your shirt on. No, it doesn’t excuse anything.

People are responsible for their own actions. Tom Riddle’s dad didn’t love him either, and does that excuse him committing genocide? No? So why should Snape’s acne problem excuse him participating in genocide and attempting to make his supposed “true love“‘s child into someone just as bitter and miserable as he was? Look, Snape wasn’t just a little creepy. He was a murderer. He was as abusive as Dolores Umbridge. He was as self-centered as Voldemort. Harry was abused as a child, and he didn’t turn out to be a complete monster, so why does Snape get a free pass?

IN CONCLUSION

Romanticisting Snape is not only incredibly stupid and short-sighted, it’s dangerous. Putting men like this into fiction and presenting them as “good guys” or morally grey or brave or deserving of sympathy encourages the boys who read these books to behave like Snape, and it encourages the straight girls/gay boys who read these books to accept the existence of these men in real life and to want to date them. Which you don’t ever, ever want to do.

If you ever meet a Snape in real life, run the other way, and don’t give him your sympathy.

tl;dr Having a sad backstory does not automatically make you sympathetic. Doing one good thing does not automatically make you a beacon of bravery and justice. Fuck you, Snivellus.

WOMP THERE IT IS

radjew:

if you buy me cute underwear i’ll model it for you

(via housewifeswag)

My life.

(via housewifeswag)

prepare-for-stupid:

dontyouwannadance:

Yo its’ okay if you’re a white girl who likes Uggs and spray tans and pop music and instagramming your Starbucks. Don’t let tumblr make you think for one minute that liking things like that makes you inferior.

Same goes for if you’re a hipster trans mexican/japanese Pizza Underground enthusiast with a hello kitty neck tattoo.

If you’re not hurting anyone, you be you. There’s nothing wrong with that.

PRAISE

(via housewifeswag)

awkwardjuggalogamer:

rainbowthundercunt:

I did The Color Run 5k yesterday. The color powder is not stopped by 2 layers of shirts. Hehe.
I’m still a little blue.

Wow! Looks fun!
Is that the swiess one?

Swiess? I’m not sure what you’re referencing. This was in Los Angeles. I’m not sure who/what produced the event.

princesshawkguy:

the struggle between “i’m too lazy to shave my legs plus it’s a nice fuck you to gender expectations” and “i want legs as smooth as baby dolphins” is so real

If laser hair removal worked on blond hair, I’d fucking do it.

(via horrorcrunch)

shinyfabulousdarling:

jbbartram:

Everyone, meet Lunultrices polymitario (common name: Mooncream Stitchwing), Lunultrices polymitario, meet everyone.

A gigantic, crepuscular member of the order Lepidoptera, the Mooncream moth is usually sighted flittering heavily through the thick summer dusk, stopping to feed on night-blooming flowers and resting languorously on gnarled trees.

I found this specimen resting on a tree near my apartment last night and was thrilled to find this morning that it had spent the night, allowing me the chance to take considerably better photos of its impressive wings.

This Mooncream moth’s body is made from fur-pieces salvaged from the scraps bin at a fabric store, hot glue, wire and feathers. The wings are hand-embroidered and took approximately 30 episodes of the West Wing to complete (yes, I measure art-time by TV episodes, what of it?).

When I was taking these photos, I fooled a family walking by and some neighbours having breakfast on their porch into thinking it was real, which added to the joy of having finally finished the thing!

this is gorgeous

and i also measure time in tv episodes… 

queenofthesmileys I thought of you!

(via hardcorestitchcorps)

ctgraphy:

And don’t underestimate the importance of BODY LANGUAGE
Cosplayer: srawr
The Little Mermaid
ACEN 2014

(via dirtydisneydames)

chortle is a great word
rainbowthundercunt rainbowthundercunt Said:

You are correct. It is a great word.

lookatthislittlething:

archiemcphee:

Today we step into the Archie McPhee Library to explore a macabre and fascinating book entitled The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death [Buy on Amazon] by Corinne May Botz, whose outstanding photos reveal one of the strangest and most significant tools in the development of modern forensic analysis: eighteen miniature, exhaustively detailed crime scene models built in the 1940s and 50s by pioneering criminologist Frances Glessner Lee (1878-1962). She called her models “Nutshell Studies” because, “the purpose of a forensic investigation is said to be to ‘convict the guilty, clear the innocent, and find the truth in a nutshell.’”

Glessner Lee was a grandmother in her 60s when she painstakingly created these dollhouse models, each of which is based on an actual homicide, suicide or accidental death. To help ensure accuracy she attended autopsies and made sure that even the smallest details of her models were correct. Clothing is appropriately worn out, pencils write, locks, windows, and lights all function, whistles blow, and mice inhabit the walls. These astonishing models were (and still are!) used to train detectives on how to asses visual evidence.

Corinne May Botz’s lush color photographs lure viewers into every crevice of Frances Lee’s models and breathe life into these deadly miniatures, which present the dark side of domestic life, unveiling tales of prostitution, alcoholism, and adultery. The accompanying line drawings, specially prepared for this volume, highlight the noteworthy forensic evidence in each case. Botz’s introductory essay, which draws on archival research and interviews with Lee’s family and police colleagues, presents a captivating portrait of Lee.

Frances Glessner Lee was also an heiress who used her considerable fortune to found Harvard’s department of legal medicine, the first forensic pathology program in the nation. In 1943 she was appointed an honorary Captain in the New Hampshire State Police. She was the first woman in the United States to hold that rank.

It’s a dark topic, to be sure, but this beautiful book is an intimate and utterly captivating look at the work of a truly remarkable woman and one of the most important figures in the development of modern forensic analysis.

[Images via the New York Times and The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death]

This is your semi-regular reminder that a really smart and skilled lady made dollhouse version of crime scenes to train police detectives on how to asses and interpret visual evidence. In the 1940s and 50s. They are currently kept in Baltimore at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner and can only be viewed by appointment (they also loan them out to other police agencies).

There is also a documentary about the Nutshell Studies that is available to stream on netflix called “Of Dolls and Murder” which is super good and narrated by John Waters (who else?) and you should watch it if you want to know more. Although I have to warn you, no one tells you the solutions to these crimes.